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Dominican Sisters of Peace is a US-based congregation of Catholic Dominicans that includes about 600 Sisters and 500 Associates living and serving in 37 states and in eight additional countries. As part of the worldwide Order of Preachers (Order of St. Dominic), the Dominican Sisters and Associates of Peace strive to preach the Gospel of Christ Jesus through word and action, serving God's people in many ministerial areas, including education, health care, spirituality, pastoral care, prison ministry, and care of creation, among others.

Dominican Sisters of Peace

A ‘Band of Mothers’ Join the Memphis Associates

Monday, September 15, 2014

I just spent the weekend immersed in Dominican life in Memphis Tennessee. My first activity was to meet several current Memphis Associates – Lynn Lofton, Nancy Ganz, JoAnn Lynn, Amy Moody, Julia Schuster, Gretchen Kirk, Tine Williams, Libba Nance and JoAnne O'Brien-Scott. We gathered in small groups for informal conversations on why they initially committed, have remained Dominican Associates of Peace and what being an Associate means to them.

Learning to Light the Fire

Thursday, September 11, 2014

When I was in Girl Scouts, I learned how make a fire. I collected the tinder, kindling, and large pieces of wood and then constructed and lit the tinder which then lit the kindling and the larger pieces of wood. The fire would leap from the small elements to the larger and the fire would then burn strong and hot.

The Holy Spirit sometimes works in the same way in our own lives. I know that the still small voice inside of me that first began to beckon me to discern my Call – began as a little spark. That spark was tended and fanned into flame by the sisters I met as I discerned my vocation. Perhaps there was a particular sister who did that for you? Perhaps you are a discerner who has a Sister doing that for you now?

Once We Were Slaves and Now We Are Free

Wednesday, September 10, 2014

Brueggemann, in Chapter 3, decides of all the implied meanings in shalom to focus first on freedom: Jesus Christ frees. God intends freedom. It is clear to us all that our biblical story—our biblical faith—begins in the story of the exodus. Taken historically, that story is about how a band of Israelites were freed one wondrous night long ago. Taken theologically, it is the announcement of how God’s purpose for freedom intruded radically into history and redesigned the direction of history. Now history becomes the story of how God’s purpose for freedom made its powerful way in the affairs of persons and nations. Exodus has given us a model to understand that the key problem in human experience is the problem of oppression, embodied here in the Pharaoh.

9/11: Creating the Seeds of Compassion

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

When reflecting on 9/11, I remember a time of great pain and great love, a time of faith and testing, of endings and beginnings. The sky was the bluest I can remember, in contrast to the grayness of the events to come.

Soon after the second plane hit the second twin tower I joined members of the Kentucky Council of Churches for a scheduled meeting. The previously planned agenda was ignored. We shared tears, prayers, silence and fears. What happened at that meeting carried on in the days to come—compassion and gentleness with those around us. Wherever I went I heard people on cell phones saying ‘I love you’ to parents, spouses and friends. There was a sense of urgency to reach out and make certain that people knew we cared.

Dominican Garage Sales Are Fun and Profitable!

Monday, September 8, 2014

Dateline: Great Bend Kansas on a sunny Saturday!

Dominican Women Afire

Friday, September 5, 2014

Sometimes there are events in our lives that deeply touch our hearts and engage our minds and we cannot wait to tell the ones we love all about them! Over the Labor Day Weekend, 13 of us had such an experience in San Antonio, Texas, where we prayed, listened, and deliberated with over 130 other Dominican Sisters in our formation cohort from around the country. This event was named - Dominican Women Afire!

In the days ahead, after we have had some more time to reflect on what we experienced, we hope to share more with you about this San Antonio gathering. We will want to solicit your thoughts and glean your wisdom and insights about ideas that surfaced there for how we all may with Spirit-fed vitality continue to offer our "common treasure"—Dominican Life and Mission—as an OP Family in this 21st Century.

When You Have Said Shalom, You’ve Said it All

Wednesday, September 3, 2014

Many thanks to Sr. Jan Schlichting for her fine sharing of Pope Francis's writings on the homily.

Today I resume excerpts from Walter Brueggemann’s book, Peace.

Peacemaking in Daily Life

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

At a recent fund raising dinner for Interfaith Paths to Peace I had the privilege of hearing a reflection on "how I go about peacemaking in my daily life." There were many creative examples of furthering peacemaking in one’s everyday life. I would like to share a few.

Widen your circle. No one is a stranger. We are all just branches of the same tree. When I help you, I am helping myself. This is true, but difficult to see unless we are willing to look deeper and see our common roots. Genetically we are 99.5% the same. Let's build on that circle.

Keep a good question in front of you. A good question focuses our attention without closing off discovery. What does compassion want for ______________ (name of your city/town). Sit with that question for a lifetime.

"SBNR"... A Growing Population

Thursday, August 28, 2014

There is a growing group of individuals who describe themselves as "spiritual but not religious" (SBNR). Though the phrase can have different meaning for each individual, it generally means that the person sees themselves as spiritual people, but they do not subscribe to organized religious traditions. With its own Facebook page and website, the SBNR phrase seems to resonate with a good number of people, especially in the younger generation who are seeking deeper meaning and spirituality in their lives, but have become disillusioned with traditional religion for a variety of reasons.

Pope Francis on Preaching, Part IV

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

Pope Francis concludes with three intertwining topics: Personalizing the Word, Lectio Divina, and an Ear to the People. In Personalizing the Word and Lectio Divina he makes it clear that we must allow the scripture to "penetrate (our) thoughts and feelings." Not only must we attentively walk through the Word but we must allow the Word to walk through us. People want to hear the Good News from a witness, or as put by homiletic writer George Sittler, someone who comes "still trembling from the encounter with the Word." Although we are humbled, even tempted to silence by our flaws, we keep "growing and wanting to grow,

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